Intermediate Chords tutorials
15. Intermediate chords summary
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So I am thinking this is another one of those filler like posts?

  1. Topics of discussion
  2. Intermediate chords reviewed

1. Topics of discussion

In this tutorial, we will review the intermediate chords we have learned so far and also take a look at what's next. So, let's have some fun.

2. Intermediate chords reviewed

During the last 10 or so tutorials we have learned a great deal about some more complicated chords. We started by learning about the 5 different types of seventh chords:

  • major seventh - chords which consist of a major triad on top of which we add the 7th note of the major scale of the root note (or in other words, a major seventh)
  • dominant seventh - chords which consist of a major triad on top of which we add the flatted 7th note of the major scale of the root note (or in other words, a minor seventh)
  • minor seventh - chords which consist of a minor triad on top of which we add the flatted 7th note of the major scale of the root note (or in other words, a minor seventh)
  • minor seventh flat five - chords which consist of a diminished triad on top of which we add the flatted 7th note of the major scale of the root note (or in other words, a minor seventh)
  • diminished seventh - chords which consist of a diminished triad on top of which we add the double flatted 7th note of the major scale of the root note (or in other words, a diminished seventh)

We then tackled the task of incorporating seventh chords in our chord progressions, before we learned about chord inversions, which occur when we take a triad and play it by starting on the middle note, which gives us the first inversion or on the top note, which gives us the second inversion.

We then moved on to suspended chords, which consist of an altered triad. We can substitute the middle note of a triad (the 3 which helps us form a major or minor third) with a 2 (a major second) which gives us suspended 2 (sus2) chords or with a 4 (a perfect fourth), which gives us suspended 4 (sus4) chords.

The next subject we talked about are power chords which basically occur when you play a fifth musical interval. We also learned that you can simply play the fifth or add the root note an octave higher in your chord.

We also tackled augmented chords which do not occur that much in common scales. They do appear in the harmonic and melodic minor scales, because of the altered notes in these scale variations (sharp 7th for harmonic minor, sharp 6th and 7th for melodic).

Finally, we took a brief look at how one can escape the CAGED system in order to add more variety to chords.

So what next? Well, there is the advanced chords course, in which we talk about...you know, more advanced chords, while also learning a bit about what role each chord has in a scale, based on the degree of the root note. We will also tackle chord progressions in more detail, in order to understand how one can create chord progressions based on the chord roles mentioned above.

Until then, I wish you happy studying and I can't wait for you to embark on your next learning journey.

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